?

Log in

No account? Create an account
delirium happy

Just keep on trying till you run out of cake

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
Snow joke
delirium happy
rho
My friends page seems to be full of people saying "whee", "yay", "squee" and similar things over the fact that it's snowing over much of Britain. Thus far, I have seen precisely one person offer a negative opinion as to the current meteorological conditions in Britain. It's time to redress this balance somewhat, I think.

See, to start with, at least here, it isn't even particularly pretty snow. It's patchy. No white blanket over the world. No glistening snow on the naked silhouettes of trees. Not enough for children (young and old) to make snowmen. In short, none of the stuff that actually makes snow nice.

What we actually have is just enough to turn into ugly brown slush on roads, and to massively disrupt the country's transport infrastructure.

Note for merkins and other aliens: Britain gets snow every year. It's not as if we're in Hawaii or Kenya or somewhere like that. And yet, every single year, without fail, 5mm of snow will fall and the roads and rails will grind to a halt, unable to deal with such extreme weather conditions. As far as I am aware, this is a uniquely British phenomenon, akin to our having hosepipe bans most every Summer despite being an incredibly wet country. For a country so obsessed with weather, we are incredibly bad at dealing with it.

Now, fortunately for me, Wednesdays are my day off, so I got to sit nice and snug and warm inside all day. Tomorrow, however, I'm not so lucky. Here is how my day tomorrow will probably go, if there's so much as a hint of a trace of snow. I will have to get up even earlier than normal, to allow for the roads being packed. I will then have a moderately normal day in university. Then will come the fun bit. Coming home. First, I will take a bus from university to the train station. This will probably be somewhat disrupted, but will probably still run. Then I will get to the train station, where it's anyone's guess what I might find. It's possible that I might find the trains running normally. It's also possible that I might find that there's nothing at all going in my direction for three hours, after which I have to take a bus to Preston and wait another hour and a half for a train back to Chorley. And then the bus at the end is equally as uncertain. Maybe it will exist, maybe it won't.

It might all be fine, but the point is that public transport here is incredibly unreliable. And I don't think I'm going to trust it to the extent of being willing to sit around for hours at a time in Lancaster station if it's unreliable. And even if it isn't actually showing any signs of snowing tomorrow morning, there's still a high risk that it will snow at some point during the day, leaving me screwed when I want to get home.

So it looks likely that tomorrow will be another day spent indoors for me. Which wouldn't be a bad thing, particularly, except that I have work I need to hand in tomorrow, which carries a "no late submissions will be marked" sort of disclaimer (and it's worth pointing out that this isn't me procrastinating -- we were only given the work yesterday. This is the lecturer who is currently pissing me off no end). Well, if I do decide that I can't make it, then I'll fire off an email saying "can't make it; public transport crap; blame the government" (or something) and hope that they're feeling kind. And if not, then sod it. It's only a single piece of work. I'm averaging somewhere over 90% in my maths so far, and I only need something like 60% overall to be able to do what I want to next year, so one 0 wouldn't kill me.

But yes. Snow. Snow sucks.

  • 1
*piles a bunch of snow on you and smiles sweetly* We have about 7 inches here. NYC public schools decided to close last night, which I don't remember ever happening (although it probably did).

** As far as I am aware, this is a uniquely British phenomenon, akin to our having hosepipe bans most every Summer despite being an incredibly wet country. For a country so obsessed with weather, we are incredibly bad at dealing with it. **

Huh. By this theory, most Minnesotans are British.

shamanix and I have a theory that Minnesotans forget how to drive in Weather.

Sunny weather. Snowy weather. Cloudy weather. Foggy weather. "It rained three hours ago and the roads are still slightly damp" weather. "There might be a hint of sun peeking through that thick layer of clouds" weather.

Pretty much anything except lightly overcast, in other words.

(This is based on an entirely unscientific but thoroughly examined pattern of our commutes.)

Minnesotans also talk about weather all the time.

(Actually, maybe that's the corollary: the more you talk about the weather, the less good you are at actually dealing with it?)

(Actually, maybe that's the corollary: the more you talk about the weather, the less good you are at actually dealing with it?)

Sounds pretty accurate. I live in Ireland, where it rains more or less constantly and where people also talk about the weather more or less constantly. And, generally, sound shocked that it is, once more, raining!

:O There are other people that dislike snow? I'm not alone?

Snow is new and pretty! Snow is good.

Snow is cold and damp and *cold*. Not Good.

It's now snowing in London. London is really not used to dealing with snow. Ccooke is working in Central London. I am slightly worried about him getting home tonight.

But did I say Pretty?

It's Pretty!

Snow makes it hard to cycle. :-(

Sounds like snow in Britain is like rain in the Bay Area. It comes every year, but nobody can remember how to drive when it happens.

The snow in my area was more like a heavy frost, but people were still predicting the Ultimate Demise Of All Transport. For 1/16" of snow and a patch or two of ice.

It's the surprise that gets to me. I mean, you wouldn't expect winter weather in winter now, would you? What a silly notion.

Snow. Meh.

  • 1