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delirium happy

Just keep on trying till you run out of cake

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Serving suggestion
delirium pissed off
rho
I was eating some cheese just now -- Sainsbury's Somerset goat's cheese, as it happens -- when I chanced to look upon its packaging. Upon this packagaing was a picture of a piece of cheese lying on a table, cut into by a knife, with a small corner of what was probably a piece of bread just visible next to it. Naturally, this also comes with the disclaimer "serving suggestion" just in case any of us thought that the little piece of cheese no more than about 5cm in any direction and in mostly-transparent packaging actually contained a table as well.

That type of warning makes me want to tear my hair out. I feel sorely tempted to boycott anything which carries utterly ridiculous warnings, from now on. Salted peanuts saying "warning: may contain nuts" are right out, as are anything which "may be hot when heated". Of course, I'm going to have to resist the temptation, in this case, seeing as how the only other alternative is probably to starve.

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"Serving suggestion" is legally required - and for fairly good reasons - though it is somewhat redundant on anything with transparent packaging. Don't blame the producer for that.

Well, thanks for the information, but I disagree on one point. I think that that's a spectacularly bad law, and shall shift my blame from the manufacturers to the legislators. If the warning is on everything then it becomes entirely meaningless. It'd be like requiring all products to carry a "warning" may cause death if used inappropriately" on them. It's undoubtedly true, but having the warning on pens and handkerchiefs would make people ignore the warning on bottle of noxious chemicals. As a consumer, what I'd like to see is the warning given only in cases where there is an ambiguity and the picture could be misleading.

"Serving suggestion" is legally required

I read somewhere that similar things apply to, say, "may cause drowsiness" on chemicals that may cause drowsiness -- even on things such as sleeping pills where that's the entire point. Something about its being easier to frame the law as a blanket than have to worry about exactly which things merit an exception for "obviousness" or "common sense".

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